ALL PAST & FUTURE EVENTS AS WELL AS MASTERCLASSES WITH A SINGLE ANNUAL PASS

Printed & Flexible Sensors & Actuators

13-14 October 2021
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Topics Covered


Printed | Hybrid | Flexible Sensors & Actuators | Electronic Skin Patches | Stretchable Sensors and Electronics | E-Textiles | Liquid Metals | Logistics | Medical | Toys | Automotive | Smart Patches

Leading global speakers include:

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13 October 2021
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TechBlick

Wednesday

Welcome and Introduction to TechBlick

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1:00pm

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Khasha Ghaffarzadeh

CEO & Founder

All, Sensors, Wearables

Welcome and Introduction to TechBlick

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1:00pm

13 October 2021
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Nutromics

Wednesday

Continuous Molecular Monitoring (CMM) wearables are the next step in medical wearables after Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) devices

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1:10pm

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Robert Batchelor

Head of Biosensors

There is a clinical need for continuous monitoring of vital molecular biomarkers and drug concentrations. However, with the exception of venous oxygen and glucose, these concentrations are currently determined via lab tests. Lab testing costs valuable time, which is relevant for transient biomarkers and critically sick patients. Additionally, lab testing is intermittent at best, and requires infrastructure, reagents, and skilled operators, which aren’t always available in remote locations.

Electrochemical aptamer-based (EAB) sensors, invented and developed by Prof. Kevin Plaxco at the University of California, Santa Barbara, can be adapted for multiple molecular targets, are reagent-free, and work in-vivo, thus enabling on-body wearable devices. Nutromics is integrating the EAB technology into a wearable ‘lab on the skin’ to meet the pressing clinical need of monitoring molecular biomarkers and drugs.

In this presentation I will discuss the EAB sensor technology, how it compares with continuous glucose monitors, the advantages and limitations of the technology, and finally, the potential of Continuous Molecular Monitoring (CMM) wearable devices using EAB sensors.

All, Wearables, Sensors

Continuous Molecular Monitoring (CMM) wearables are the next step in medical wearables after Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) devices

More Details

1:10pm

There is a clinical need for continuous monitoring of vital molecular biomarkers and drug concentrations. However, with the exception of venous oxygen and glucose, these concentrations are currently determined via lab tests. Lab testing costs valuable time, which is relevant for transient biomarkers and critically sick patients. Additionally, lab testing is intermittent at best, and requires infrastructure, reagents, and skilled operators, which aren’t always available in remote locations.

Electrochemical aptamer-based (EAB) sensors, invented and developed by Prof. Kevin Plaxco at the University of California, Santa Barbara, can be adapted for multiple molecular targets, are reagent-free, and work in-vivo, thus enabling on-body wearable devices. Nutromics is integrating the EAB technology into a wearable ‘lab on the skin’ to meet the pressing clinical need of monitoring molecular biomarkers and drugs.

In this presentation I will discuss the EAB sensor technology, how it compares with continuous glucose monitors, the advantages and limitations of the technology, and finally, the potential of Continuous Molecular Monitoring (CMM) wearable devices using EAB sensors.

13 October 2021
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University of Newcastle

Wednesday

Camera-based Vital Signs Measurement: From its Origins to the Deep Learning Era

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1:10pm

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Philipp Rouast

Researcher

Simple RGB video of the human face gives away physiological information through tiny changes in skin color and motion — imperceptible to the human eye, but measurable by the computer to produce estimates of vital signs such as heart rate and respiration rate. The technology that accomplishes this is know as remote photoplethysmography (rPPG), highlighting its major advantage of not requiring physical contact between subject and sensor.

First proposed in 2008, rPPG has yet to be widely commercialized. This is in part due to the difficulty in obtaining reliable measurements in challenging real-world conditions, especially regarding illumination conditions and subject movement. This talk will (i) introduce the basis for the signals obtained with camera sensors, (ii) walk through the technological improvements made by researchers since 2008, and (iii) summarize current issues and give an outlook on future applications.

All, Wearables, Sensors

Camera-based Vital Signs Measurement: From its Origins to the Deep Learning Era

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1:10pm

Simple RGB video of the human face gives away physiological information through tiny changes in skin color and motion — imperceptible to the human eye, but measurable by the computer to produce estimates of vital signs such as heart rate and respiration rate. The technology that accomplishes this is know as remote photoplethysmography (rPPG), highlighting its major advantage of not requiring physical contact between subject and sensor.

First proposed in 2008, rPPG has yet to be widely commercialized. This is in part due to the difficulty in obtaining reliable measurements in challenging real-world conditions, especially regarding illumination conditions and subject movement. This talk will (i) introduce the basis for the signals obtained with camera sensors, (ii) walk through the technological improvements made by researchers since 2008, and (iii) summarize current issues and give an outlook on future applications.

13 October 2021
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Atcor

Wednesday

Medical Reliable Cardiovascular Health Monitoring Using New Wearable Technology

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1:33pm

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Ahmad Qasem

Chief Science & Research Officer

Current wearable sensor technologies provide limited and less reliable health parameters based mainly on heart rate measurement. Any reliable cardiovascular health assessment requires blood pressure measurements. Many attempts had been made to provide blood pressure measurements using commercially available wearable sensors like in smart watches. However, all attempts failed in measuring blood pressure as required by medical standards. On the other hand, FDA cleared Cardiex\AtCor medical technology became the ‘gold standard’ in measuring non-invasively heart and arterial pressure parameters reflecting cardiac and arterial health.
The challenge is to adapt such medical technology into the wearable sensor devices. This involves examining different and new sensors. It also involve new methods of sensor signals based on cardiovascular physiology to extract clinically significant central arterial pressure parameters. This presentation will review current health wearable technologies, challenges in providing reliable cardiovascular health assessment, and Cardiex current development of medical wearable devices to provide clinical heart and arterial health assessments.

All, Wearables, Sensors

Medical Reliable Cardiovascular Health Monitoring Using New Wearable Technology

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1:33pm

Current wearable sensor technologies provide limited and less reliable health parameters based mainly on heart rate measurement. Any reliable cardiovascular health assessment requires blood pressure measurements. Many attempts had been made to provide blood pressure measurements using commercially available wearable sensors like in smart watches. However, all attempts failed in measuring blood pressure as required by medical standards. On the other hand, FDA cleared Cardiex\AtCor medical technology became the ‘gold standard’ in measuring non-invasively heart and arterial pressure parameters reflecting cardiac and arterial health.
The challenge is to adapt such medical technology into the wearable sensor devices. This involves examining different and new sensors. It also involve new methods of sensor signals based on cardiovascular physiology to extract clinically significant central arterial pressure parameters. This presentation will review current health wearable technologies, challenges in providing reliable cardiovascular health assessment, and Cardiex current development of medical wearable devices to provide clinical heart and arterial health assessments.

13 October 2021
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FeetMe

Wednesday

Smart Insoles for Clinical Research : a Problem-Solving Approach to Deliver Value with Continuous Mobility Assessment

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1:56pm

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Alexis Mathieu

Co-Founder & CEO

Bringing a drug to market is long and difficult. Studies estimate that the clinical trial process lasts 9 years and costs $1.3B on average. Clinical trials are conducted in multiple phases, with cost and complexity increasing from Phase I to Phase III. Despite the time and capital invested in trials, only 1 in 10 drugs that enter Phase I of a clinical trial will be approved by the FDA.
There is Large medical need to evaluate to treat the physical deterioration of physical status. A growing number of patients with mobility impairments lacks accurate tools to diagnose, monitor expensive evolutive diseases and intervene efficiently.

Gait is the simplest and most actionable biomarker to monitor multiple diseases but vastly underutilized as a biomarker or outcome measure because gait analysis is often not high quality when assessed in the clinic.Clinical gait tests, today, are used to identify mobility disorders, measure the efficacy of a therapeutic treatment. This is done in a controlled setting at sites. However, the technologies or design used present strong limitations. Episodic assessments, sometimes observational, don't generate sufficient sensitive data to demonstrate subtle changes.

The FeetMe solution allows the collection of validated gait data at site with the Insoles, and in the same accurate way in the patients daily life allowing continuous recording of gait data.

All, Wearables, Sensors

Smart Insoles for Clinical Research : a Problem-Solving Approach to Deliver Value with Continuous Mobility Assessment

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1:56pm

Bringing a drug to market is long and difficult. Studies estimate that the clinical trial process lasts 9 years and costs $1.3B on average. Clinical trials are conducted in multiple phases, with cost and complexity increasing from Phase I to Phase III. Despite the time and capital invested in trials, only 1 in 10 drugs that enter Phase I of a clinical trial will be approved by the FDA.
There is Large medical need to evaluate to treat the physical deterioration of physical status. A growing number of patients with mobility impairments lacks accurate tools to diagnose, monitor expensive evolutive diseases and intervene efficiently.

Gait is the simplest and most actionable biomarker to monitor multiple diseases but vastly underutilized as a biomarker or outcome measure because gait analysis is often not high quality when assessed in the clinic.Clinical gait tests, today, are used to identify mobility disorders, measure the efficacy of a therapeutic treatment. This is done in a controlled setting at sites. However, the technologies or design used present strong limitations. Episodic assessments, sometimes observational, don't generate sufficient sensitive data to demonstrate subtle changes.

The FeetMe solution allows the collection of validated gait data at site with the Insoles, and in the same accurate way in the patients daily life allowing continuous recording of gait data.

13 October 2021
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Sony

Wednesday

Improving trust for connected devices in remote monitoring, with security-by-design technology

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1:56pm

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Anders Strömberg

Head of Wearable Platform

In this talk, Anders Strömberg, Director, Head of Wearable Platform Division, Sony Network Communications Europe, will discuss the issue of trust in IoT devices for remote monitoring, the challenges and some possible solutions.
Care providers need to monitor the wellbeing of their patients. That means staying connected with them wherever they are, whatever they’re doing. Most of today’s remote monitoring applications require pairing with cell phones or smartwatches, using standard LTE connectivity.
Healthcare providers are continuously seeking to increase the quantity and quality of information available, and to offer end-users more practical, timely insights. How can they do this while also providing solutions that are as easy for all kinds of end-users to handle?
The answer lies in the convergence of new IoT, telecommunications and AI technologies which enable access to rich data and allow service providers to develop new solutions; solutions that, for example, improve adherence to prescriptions, enable early detection of conditions like diabetes and boost the users’ general health and wellbeing.
Both service providers and end users show a high level of acceptance and willingness to adopt these new technologies in the pursuit of better health and health services. However, there are some serious trust issues when it comes to IoT. Although the risks are not new, concerns have risen to a new level because of the vast number of IoT devices deployed in the field and the way in which they are being used.
Against this backdrop, Strömberg will discuss the balancing act required to bring trust and quality of service together to enable the future of healthcare and put forward some ideas about how to provide access to more, better and diverse data that enables greater insights and tailored services.

All, Wearables, Sensors

Improving trust for connected devices in remote monitoring, with security-by-design technology

More Details

1:56pm

In this talk, Anders Strömberg, Director, Head of Wearable Platform Division, Sony Network Communications Europe, will discuss the issue of trust in IoT devices for remote monitoring, the challenges and some possible solutions.
Care providers need to monitor the wellbeing of their patients. That means staying connected with them wherever they are, whatever they’re doing. Most of today’s remote monitoring applications require pairing with cell phones or smartwatches, using standard LTE connectivity.
Healthcare providers are continuously seeking to increase the quantity and quality of information available, and to offer end-users more practical, timely insights. How can they do this while also providing solutions that are as easy for all kinds of end-users to handle?
The answer lies in the convergence of new IoT, telecommunications and AI technologies which enable access to rich data and allow service providers to develop new solutions; solutions that, for example, improve adherence to prescriptions, enable early detection of conditions like diabetes and boost the users’ general health and wellbeing.
Both service providers and end users show a high level of acceptance and willingness to adopt these new technologies in the pursuit of better health and health services. However, there are some serious trust issues when it comes to IoT. Although the risks are not new, concerns have risen to a new level because of the vast number of IoT devices deployed in the field and the way in which they are being used.
Against this backdrop, Strömberg will discuss the balancing act required to bring trust and quality of service together to enable the future of healthcare and put forward some ideas about how to provide access to more, better and diverse data that enables greater insights and tailored services.

13 October 2021
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TNO Holst Centre

Wednesday

Facilitating Wellness throughout the Human Life Cycle through Next Generation Wearables and Sensors

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2:19pm