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Innovations in printed electronics & wearable technology


In this newsletter, TechBlick covers a range of innovations in printed electronics and wearable technology. The highlighted technology covers truly wearable electrophysiology, transparent heaters for ADAS, dry ink-less printing, soft bioelectronics, machine washable inks, graphene e-tattoos, ultrathin ICs and high-pitch bonding, arterial pulse wave monitoring, and more.


All these technologies will be presented live at TechBlick’s free-to-attend event taking place on 2-DEC-2022. This event will bring together 25+ presenters over two parallel live tracks, 30+ live virtual exhibitors and 400+ attendees from around the world in a unique virtual environment.


Check out the full combined agenda and register for free here


Truly wearable electrophysiology: combining printed electronics, low power electronics & data


Contemporary electroencephalography (EEG) and surface electromyography (sEMG) is notoriously cumbersome. Using printed electronics, low-power electronics and data analysis tools the X-trodes system brings electrophysiology techniques to a new level: By eliminating the need to handle multiple electrodes, wires and amplification units electrophysiological monitoring can be achieved while maintaining electrode-skin stability, and user convenience during prolonged use (hours). The presentation will outline several important applications (focusing on sleep monitoring at home and facial muscles) and how each can benefit from the convergence of electrophysiology and novel skin electrophysiology.


Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at the TechBlick wearables conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference.


Check out the agenda and register for free here www.TechBlick.com/wearables



Printed Heaters, ADAS, LIDARs, Radars: What is the connection?


Since advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) hit the auto market, reliable LiDAR and RADAR systems are crucial in the development of advanced self-driving vehicles. A significant challenge is to guarantee clear visibility even in the harshest environmental conditions.


To ensure visibility during winter, the RADAR & LiDAR sensor covers are currently equipped with wire-based heating solutions. This state-of-the-art solution comes with some technological challenges during the manufacturing process, causing significant scrap rates. The homogeneity of the sensor cover temperature is often inadequate and overheating or even burning issues have been detected

ATT advanced thermal technologies GmbH has developed two alternative variants, both screen printed onto (transparent) polycarbonate foils, saving process costs with respect to the currently available embedded wire technology.


Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at TechBlick’s Printed Electronics Innovations conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference. Check out the agenda and register for free here https://www.techblick.com/PE-innovation-day




Soft electronic system: combining rigid electronics with stretchable thin light substrates


Dr Yeo's group at Georgia Tech University is doing pioneering work on soft materials, flexible mechanics, nanomanufacturing, machine learning, and system packaging to develop intelligent soft wearable biosensors and bioelectronics. These systems combine soft stretchable flexible substrates and materials with rigid electronics, creating soft yet powerful electronic systems.

The diversity of the research programme is fascinating. In slide one, you can see a selection of ongoing projects in Dr Yeo's research group regarding the study of soft materials and the development of soft biosensors and bioelectronics


In slide 2, you can see a picture showing the comparison between a soft electronic system on the fingers and conventional rigid wearables on the wrist. This Is where the true advantage of soft electronic systems shines!

In slide 3 you can see examples of developed wearable bioelectronic systems. Here, one can see the combination of extreme stretchability, thinness, and rigid ICs and electronics.

Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at the TechBlick wearables conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference.


Check out the agenda and register for free here www.TechBlick.com/wearables




Dry ink-less digital printing with in-situ sintering


Current printing technologies are based on wet printing methods such as inkjet and aerosol jet printers that suffer from complex and expensive ink formulation, limited printing material options, contaminations, low shelf life, and costly post-processing. Slide one shows a typical process.

NanoPrintek has developed the world’s first “dry multi-material printer”. This novel technology can transform printing from a traditional liquid-based to a dry printing technology. This printer is schematically demonstrated in slide 2, showing how nanoparticles are in-situ generated from a solid target to form a jet of nanoparticles which digitally prints onto the end substrates without ever requiring ink.

Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at TechBlick’s Printed Electronics Innovations conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference. Check out the agenda and register for free here https://www.techblick.com/PE-innovation-day




Arterial Pulse Wave Monitoring: Piezoelectric e-tattoos


Tampere University researchers have developed a wearable highly unobtrusive low-cost e-tattoo enabling measurements of arterial pulse waves based on piezoelectric technology.


Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the most common cause of death in the world accounting for approximately 30 % (~17.9 million) of all deaths in 2016. Extrapolating from this, the size of the risk group in danger of developing potentially lethal CVDs is counted in hundreds of millions worldwide (the US alone was estimated to have 82.6 million people with CVD in a 2010 study). Continuous arterial pulse wave (PW) monitoring has been recently suggested to monitor this immense risk group. However, at the moment there exists no solution that would combine the cost-effective fabrication, unobtrusiveness and accuracy of these devices.

In this work, a scalable and cost-effective printing-based fabrication method for an electronic tattoo (e-tattoo) type PW-sensor has been developed and investigated. The device is based on based on P(VDF-TrFE) piezoelectric technology.

Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at the TechBlick wearables conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference.

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Check out the agenda and register for free here www.TechBlick.com/wearables




Advancements in hybrid flexible electronics towards ultra-fine pitch bonding


Hybrid flexible systems combine printed electronics with the high-power computing of established silicon electronics. To keep systems truly flexible, ultra-thin chips are utilized.

The slide below shows an example of preparing ultrachip dies from wafer singulation to creating thin dies. These dies are then placed upon flexible substrates with printed metallization and other printed components, creating hybrid flexible systems.

A key challenge here is bonding, in particular achieving ultra-fine pitch bonding, so that a wider range of ICs - complex ICs with high I/Os - are compatible and so that electronic designers can choose from a familiar repertoire of components to create products

Slide 2 shows various chip integration approaches for flexible hybrid electronics. Broadly speaking, one can divide this into chip-first and chip-last approaches. In the chip-first approach with flip chip bonding, traditional bonding techniques like solder, interposers, ACA/ACF, ICA, NCA, are utilized. In chip-last chip-on-flex techniques, printed interconnects are used. This is a hot area of development to enable complex next-gen flexible hybrid systems combining best-in-class chips with printed circuits

Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at TechBlick’s Printed Electronics Innovations conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference. Check out the agenda and register for free here https://www.techblick.com/PE-innovation-day




Carbon pastes: 100x machine washable + R2R printing for e-textiles


Washability is one of the critical challenges for the adoption of electronic apparel. A*Start (Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology) has shown that it can address consumer requirementsfor by reformulating the electrode material and developing integration techniques to fulfil a 100-wash cycle challenge. As shown in slide 1, this is a machine-washable carbon paste formulation suitable for R2R printing.


Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at the TechBlick wearables conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference.


Check out the agenda and register for free here www.TechBlick.com/wearables




MXenes for electronics and printed electronics


An emerging class of two-dimensional (2-D) materials group, crystalline 2-D transition metal carbides or nitrides (MXene), has attracted considerable interest in the past decade. Murata has focused on electrically conductive MXenes, especially for Ti3C2Tx in a spray-coated film state (18000 S/cm at 5 um thickness). The hydrophilic nanosheet with outstanding properties (conductivity, high surface area and versatile surface chemistry) is a promising candidate of materials for flexible electronics using an eco-friendly manufacturing process.

The swelling behaviour of MXene by moisture is a roadblock to its applications in electronics. The interlayer spacing of the layered structure is increased as stored in 60C/85% RH, which causes the degradation in electrical properties and the following oxidative reaction to TiO2. Murata has developed the concept of guest accommodation via hydrogen bonding to block water diffusion and demonstrated that it improves environmental stability in humid conditions.

Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at TechBlick’s Printed Electronics Innovations conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference. Check out the agenda and register for free here https://www.techblick.com/PE-innovation-day




Why are graphene tattoos the superior wearable interfaces?


Why are graphene tattoos the superior wearable interfaces? Why are graphene tattoos the superior wearable interfaces? What is it that you can do with graphene tattoos but not with other wearable systems? The answer is cuffless capturing of Blood Pressure! First, let's look into blood pressure (BP). BP is a vital representative sign of your health. If you have any problem with the cardiovascular system, BP will show it. But! To really catch the problem early, you need to measure BP continuously. Can it be done? Well, the modern technology of monitoring the BP is archaic and based on 100 years old sphygmomanometers.


Dmitry Kireev and Deji Akinwande from The University of Texas at Austin and Kaan Sel and Roozbeh Jafari from Texas A&M University will report on a unique technology capable of cuffless monitoring of Blood Pressure. The measurements are performed electrically, using Bioimpedance modality (Bio-Z), and graphene tattoos play the essential role of imperceptible and self-adhesive bio-interfaces. The Bio-Z is performed dynamically with >10kHz sampling rate. A change in arterial volume (blood inflow) will affect the measured Bio-Z value.


Read more about this technology and see the slides here. Alternatively, This technology will be presented live online at the TechBlick wearables conference on 2 Dec 2022. This is an online FREE-to-Attend conference.


Check out the agenda and register for free here www.TechBlick.com/wearables





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