top of page

ALL PAST & FUTURE EVENTS AS WELL AS MASTERCLASSES WITH A SINGLE ANNUAL PASS

Mini- & Micro-LED Displays: Markets, Manufacturing Innovations, Applications, Promising Start-ups

30 Nov - 1 Dec 2022
1pm - 9pm

CET:

Virtual Event

This is the first-ever event worldwide dedicated to mini and microLED technologies. It will highlight the full spectrum of technological and market developments in the field, covering all aspects including market analysis, novel LED growth on Si and other substrates, innovative transfer techniques, latest color conversation and novel approaches to RGB displays, drivers and backplanes, repair and inspection, manufacturing and scale up, products and demonstrators, etc. The event will bring together OEMs, leading market researchers, as well as innovative start-ups and commercially impactful researchers. This event will be part of the TechBlick online event series and will be specifically co-located with an event on "Quantum Dots: Material Innovations and Commercial Applications.


For the 2023 agenda please visit here

Market Analysis and Forecasts | microLED | GaN uLED on Si wafers | Laser-Based Transfer Technologies | Pick and Place | Innovative Transfer Technologies | Stretchable MicroLEDs | MicroLEDs on CMOS | microTransfer Printing | Electrohydrodynamic Printing | Quantum Dots | Color Conversation | Nanoimprinting | Nanowire LEDs | Microbumps | Massive Parallel Transfer | Perovskite Quantum Dots | red ultra-small GaN microLEDs | AR/VR | Silicon Display | OTFTs | Microdispensing | Tiling | Repair and Inspection | Start Ups | Manufacturing | Scale Up

Leading global speakers include:
Samsung
Quantum Solutions
Quantum Science
QDI Systems
Morphotonics
Taiwan Nanocrystals
NTHU QLabs
Sharp
3D‑Micromac
ALLOS Semiconductors
CEA
PlayNitride
Komori Corp
Atotech
KIMM
STMicroelectronics
Enjet
Scrona
HsinLight
Saphlux
Luxnour
MICLEDI microdisplays
ASMPT
XTPL
Eindhoven Univeristy of Technology
Nanosys
EPISTAR Corporation (A Member of Ennostar)
Fraunhofer IAP
Omdia Display
Terecircuits
TNO at Holst Centre
QustomDot
SUSTech
SmartKem
UC Santa Barbara
NS Nanotech
Yole Intelligence

Avantama AG
VueReal
Coherent LaserSystems
Palomaki Consulting
MicroLED Industry Association
Gradient_edited_edited.jpg

Explore our past & upcoming events

Jamp to Agenda
Full Agenda

The times below is Central European Times (CET).
On the platform the times will automatically be changed to your time zone

Coming Soon
TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

TechBick

Wednesday

Day 1 Session 1

More Details

12.50PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png
Talk Demo

Khasha Ghaffarzadeh

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Day 1 Session 1

12.50PM

Watch Demo Video
TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Samsung

Wednesday

The Progress of Advanced QD Technology in Next Generation Display

More Details

1.00PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Tae-Gon Kim

Principal researcher

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been known to be the best candidates for emissive materials owing to their unique optical properties including high color purity and quantum efficiency. Cd-based QDs like CdSe, CdS, and CdTe have been extensively studied and their synthesis and application methods are very well developed, despite their potential harmful effects on health and the environment. Instead, InP QDs have been considered as the best alternative because of their band gaps corresponding to visible light as well as their relatively low toxicity. However, they could be easily oxidized to InPOx and have weak electronic tolerance to surface defects due to their relatively high covalent character. In this presentation, I will talk InP-based QDs showing almost unity photoluminescence quantum efficiency and long-term stability on high power blue irradiation. Based on this superior optical properties, the QDs could be applied for the color conversion pixels on blue OLED display.

All, Quantum Dots

The Progress of Advanced QD Technology in Next Generation Display

1.00PM

Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) have been known to be the best candidates for emissive materials owing to their unique optical properties including high color purity and quantum efficiency. Cd-based QDs like CdSe, CdS, and CdTe have been extensively studied and their synthesis and application methods are very well developed, despite their potential harmful effects on health and the environment. Instead, InP QDs have been considered as the best alternative because of their band gaps corresponding to visible light as well as their relatively low toxicity. However, they could be easily oxidized to InPOx and have weak electronic tolerance to surface defects due to their relatively high covalent character. In this presentation, I will talk InP-based QDs showing almost unity photoluminescence quantum efficiency and long-term stability on high power blue irradiation. Based on this superior optical properties, the QDs could be applied for the color conversion pixels on blue OLED display.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Omdia Display

Wednesday

Micro LED Display Market and Technology

More Details

1.20PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Jerry Kang

Research Manager

Micro LED display has been considered as the next generation self-emitting display technology, because LED has been known as better luminance efficiency, durability & reliability than OLED. Lots of companies have been suggested about the key technologies of the manufacturing micro LED chips, intermediate process, manufacturing backplane, mass transferring, chip bonding & repair process. But, in this moment, there are only a few applications with micro LED display yet due to significant technical issues. In this speech, we will check the current status, technical issues & market forecast of micro LED display technology. Especially, we will review these agenda with analyzing the recent studies, prototypes & products from lots of companies. So, we can suggest that how the micro LED display should be developed and focused in the future.

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Micro LED Display Market and Technology

1.20PM

Micro LED display has been considered as the next generation self-emitting display technology, because LED has been known as better luminance efficiency, durability & reliability than OLED. Lots of companies have been suggested about the key technologies of the manufacturing micro LED chips, intermediate process, manufacturing backplane, mass transferring, chip bonding & repair process. But, in this moment, there are only a few applications with micro LED display yet due to significant technical issues. In this speech, we will check the current status, technical issues & market forecast of micro LED display technology. Especially, we will review these agenda with analyzing the recent studies, prototypes & products from lots of companies. So, we can suggest that how the micro LED display should be developed and focused in the future.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

EPISTAR Corporation (A Member of Ennostar)

Wednesday

The Way from Mini to Micro LED Display

More Details

1.40PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

SY Deng

Issues and experience of mini LED adapted into the display stepping to address micro LED display outlook.

All, MicroLED

The Way from Mini to Micro LED Display

1.40PM

Issues and experience of mini LED adapted into the display stepping to address micro LED display outlook.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

SUSTech

Wednesday

III-Nitride-Based Micro-LED Displays & its Applications

More Details

2.00PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

George Zhaojun Liu

Associate Professor

All, MicroLED

III-Nitride-Based Micro-LED Displays & its Applications

2.00PM

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Networking Break

Wednesday

Meet The Speakers/Networking

More Details

2.20PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png
Talk Demo

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Meet The Speakers/Networking

2.20PM

Watch Demo Video
TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

ASMPT

Wednesday

Transfer Technologies for Mini- and Micro- LEDs

More Details

2.45PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Chun Ting Lau

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Transfer Technologies for Mini- and Micro- LEDs

2.45PM

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Coherent LaserSystems

Wednesday

Lasers are a Key Enabling Manufacturing Technology for MicroLED Displays

More Details

3.00PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Jan Brune

Manager Excimer Applications Lab

The roadmaps for MicroLED sizes are clearly indicating that future manufacturing technologies needs to be prepared for sizes down to 5 µm. Some current technologies adapted from MiniLED production are capable to process today´s MicroLED´s of around 50 µm but running into yield and basic challenges for the next generations.
Lasers are a key enabling manufacturing technology. This is because lasers have an unrivalled ability to yield smaller and more precise features at high throughput, and to work without physically damaging or overheating delicate parts.
Our presented laser processing technologies are capable to process very small MicroLED´s either from the growth (EPI) wafer, called the Laser Lift-off (LLO) or the mass transfer from temporary carriers. This is a future-proof technology approach and help MicroLED display makers to invest once, adapt a technology for the next years, and transfer the processing technologies into mass production.
We will present our latest information and results about laser processing solutions for MicroLED displays – from very small to very large displays.

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Lasers are a Key Enabling Manufacturing Technology for MicroLED Displays

3.00PM

The roadmaps for MicroLED sizes are clearly indicating that future manufacturing technologies needs to be prepared for sizes down to 5 µm. Some current technologies adapted from MiniLED production are capable to process today´s MicroLED´s of around 50 µm but running into yield and basic challenges for the next generations.
Lasers are a key enabling manufacturing technology. This is because lasers have an unrivalled ability to yield smaller and more precise features at high throughput, and to work without physically damaging or overheating delicate parts.
Our presented laser processing technologies are capable to process very small MicroLED´s either from the growth (EPI) wafer, called the Laser Lift-off (LLO) or the mass transfer from temporary carriers. This is a future-proof technology approach and help MicroLED display makers to invest once, adapt a technology for the next years, and transfer the processing technologies into mass production.
We will present our latest information and results about laser processing solutions for MicroLED displays – from very small to very large displays.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Eindhoven Univeristy of Technology

Wednesday

INSPIRE: InP on SiN photonic integrated circuits realized through wafer-scale micro-transfer printing

More Details

3.15PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Martijn Heck

Professor

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

INSPIRE: InP on SiN photonic integrated circuits realized through wafer-scale micro-transfer printing

3.15PM

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

TNO at Holst Centre

Wednesday

Laser-Assisted High-throughput microLED Assembly

More Details

3.30PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Gari Arutinov

Team Leader & Innovator

With the growing demand for ever-smaller devices, such as mini- and microLED displays with higher resolution rates, there is an unstoppable trend towards miniaturisation of components. High-speed, mass-production of these electronics is getting more and more difficult, because the handling and accurate placement of these tiny components is very challenging. Each component needs to be carefully selected, transferred and then accurately placed and assembled with interconnects – all at lightning speeds. As conventional industrial equipment fail to deposit ultrafine pattens of die attach material and handle such tiny components at required high rates, this calls for development of alternative high-throughput assembly technologies.

Holst Centre is continually pushing the boundaries of hybrid printed electronics technologies to open new frontiers and enable new promising applications. Leveraging on over a decade-long experience in development and maturing of Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technology and bringing it to the next level, we have developed a new laser-assisted printing technology – Volume-Controlled Laser Printing (VCLP) – capable of high-throughput deposition of ultrafine interconnects, such as conductive adhesives and solder pastes, from structured carrier plated covered with a proprietary permanent release layer. At Holst Centre we believe that high-throughput deposition of ultrafine interconnect patterns using VCLP technology opens up new possibilities for various applications, particularly, flip chip integration of micro-LED displays.

To complement VCLP interconnect printing technology and complete high-throughput integration of microcomponents, at Holst Centre we have developed another laser-assisted technology targeted to selectively and accurately transfer microcomponents from carrier wafers populated with high-density arrays of microcomponents. The technology has no fundamental limits to scale down to transfer of sub-10 µm microcomponents with dicing street as narrow as 5 µm. We have already demonstrated that our innovative and proprietary release stack developed at Holst Centre enables high-throughput, fast and well-controlled transfer of microcomponents, as small as 40x40x10 µm3 with 20 µm dicing street.

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Laser-Assisted High-throughput microLED Assembly

3.30PM

With the growing demand for ever-smaller devices, such as mini- and microLED displays with higher resolution rates, there is an unstoppable trend towards miniaturisation of components. High-speed, mass-production of these electronics is getting more and more difficult, because the handling and accurate placement of these tiny components is very challenging. Each component needs to be carefully selected, transferred and then accurately placed and assembled with interconnects – all at lightning speeds. As conventional industrial equipment fail to deposit ultrafine pattens of die attach material and handle such tiny components at required high rates, this calls for development of alternative high-throughput assembly technologies.

Holst Centre is continually pushing the boundaries of hybrid printed electronics technologies to open new frontiers and enable new promising applications. Leveraging on over a decade-long experience in development and maturing of Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technology and bringing it to the next level, we have developed a new laser-assisted printing technology – Volume-Controlled Laser Printing (VCLP) – capable of high-throughput deposition of ultrafine interconnects, such as conductive adhesives and solder pastes, from structured carrier plated covered with a proprietary permanent release layer. At Holst Centre we believe that high-throughput deposition of ultrafine interconnect patterns using VCLP technology opens up new possibilities for various applications, particularly, flip chip integration of micro-LED displays.

To complement VCLP interconnect printing technology and complete high-throughput integration of microcomponents, at Holst Centre we have developed another laser-assisted technology targeted to selectively and accurately transfer microcomponents from carrier wafers populated with high-density arrays of microcomponents. The technology has no fundamental limits to scale down to transfer of sub-10 µm microcomponents with dicing street as narrow as 5 µm. We have already demonstrated that our innovative and proprietary release stack developed at Holst Centre enables high-throughput, fast and well-controlled transfer of microcomponents, as small as 40x40x10 µm3 with 20 µm dicing street.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

CEA

Wednesday

Key challenges for hybridizing GaN microleds and CMOS circuits

More Details

3.45PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

François Templier

Strategic Marketing

GaN microled is the key display technology for the next generation AR/MR glasses and Metaverse. Microled arrays driven by CMOS circuits are needed for GaN microdisplays and large area displays.
Several technologies can be used to hybridize the two parts. We will review the challenges for their fabrication, show solution provided such as microtube technology and recent results with hybrid bonding.

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Key challenges for hybridizing GaN microleds and CMOS circuits

3.45PM

GaN microled is the key display technology for the next generation AR/MR glasses and Metaverse. Microled arrays driven by CMOS circuits are needed for GaN microdisplays and large area displays.
Several technologies can be used to hybridize the two parts. We will review the challenges for their fabrication, show solution provided such as microtube technology and recent results with hybrid bonding.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

ALLOS Semiconductors

Wednesday

Development of GaN uLEDs on 300mm Si wafers

More Details

4.00PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Alexander Loesing

Co Founder

All, MicroLED, Quantum Dots

Development of GaN uLEDs on 300mm Si wafers

4.00PM

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Networking Break

Wednesday

Meet The Speakers/Networking

More Details

4.15PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png
Talk Demo

Meet The Speakers/Networking

4.15PM

Watch Demo Video
TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

VueReal

Wednesday

A solution for producing cost-competitive microLED displays

More Details

4.40PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Reza Chaj

CEO

We have developed a versatile, flexible and sustainable printing process to print micrometre semiconductor/optoelectronic devices into a surface to create functional surfaces such as displays at the yield and throughput required for such products. In addition, we have developed a self-aligned process that can enable the ultimate displays needed for augmented reality (super high brightness, ultra-high resolution, full colour, low power, and very compact).

The cartridge-based printing process is developed to offer a simple, scalable tool with faster throughput, higher yield, and high uniformity. This solution does not require picking microLED for every transfer and does not require a laser for releasing microLEDs into the display substrate. As a result, it benefits from simple tools that can be scaled to a large area and offer high throughput due to simple process steps.

A solution for producing cost-competitive microLED displays

4.40PM

We have developed a versatile, flexible and sustainable printing process to print micrometre semiconductor/optoelectronic devices into a surface to create functional surfaces such as displays at the yield and throughput required for such products. In addition, we have developed a self-aligned process that can enable the ultimate displays needed for augmented reality (super high brightness, ultra-high resolution, full colour, low power, and very compact).

The cartridge-based printing process is developed to offer a simple, scalable tool with faster throughput, higher yield, and high uniformity. This solution does not require picking microLED for every transfer and does not require a laser for releasing microLEDs into the display substrate. As a result, it benefits from simple tools that can be scaled to a large area and offer high throughput due to simple process steps.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Luxnour

Wednesday

The Manufacturability Attributes of the Electromagnetic Pattern-Sensitive Head Technology for Massive Parallel Transfer of Micro-LEDs"

More Details

4.55PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Makarem Hussein

President

The Manufacturability Attributes of the Electromagnetic Pattern-Sensitive Head Technology for Massive Parallel Transfer of Micro-LEDs"

4.55PM

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

MICLEDI microdisplays

Wednesday

MicroLED display integration on 300mm Advanced CMOS platform

More Details

5.10PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Soeren Steudel

Co-founder & CTO

Tight pitch integration of compound semiconductor with advanced node CMOS like in microLED displays requires a full wafer level monolithic approach in 300mm. At pitches below 5um, the CMOS bonding is at the center and cannot be considered as an afterthought of a great LED process. Here we show a 9150ppi µLED process-flow with backplane integration that is realized in a 300mm CMOS pilot line using standard volume manufacturing equipment with a similar integration scheme as is done for 3D-stacked backside illuminated imager (BSI). This includes the realization of wafer level optics for beam-shaping. The achieved brightness exceeds 1Mnits. We discuss the inter-dependency of pitch vs manufacturing yield including epi-defectivity and epi-uniformity.

MicroLED display integration on 300mm Advanced CMOS platform

5.10PM

Tight pitch integration of compound semiconductor with advanced node CMOS like in microLED displays requires a full wafer level monolithic approach in 300mm. At pitches below 5um, the CMOS bonding is at the center and cannot be considered as an afterthought of a great LED process. Here we show a 9150ppi µLED process-flow with backplane integration that is realized in a 300mm CMOS pilot line using standard volume manufacturing equipment with a similar integration scheme as is done for 3D-stacked backside illuminated imager (BSI). This includes the realization of wafer level optics for beam-shaping. The achieved brightness exceeds 1Mnits. We discuss the inter-dependency of pitch vs manufacturing yield including epi-defectivity and epi-uniformity.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

XTPL

Wednesday

Sub-micron digital printing for microLED microbumps and QD Color Conversion

More Details

5.25PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Lukasz Kosior

Business Development Manager

Ultra-Precise Deposition (UPD) is an additive manufacturing technique for fabricating conductive and non-conductive features at a micrometer scale. The process does not require an electric field, the deposition can be made on any substrate (conductive and non-conductive, planar and 3D) and materials with viscosities up to 1 000 00 cP can be printed in full resolution range. The combination of unique features can be used for fabricating next-generation OLED, MicroLED, and QD-LED displays.
Due to precise pressure control and the system's design, UPD allows depositing material with femtoliter precision. Together with the possibility to deposit materials with viscosities up to 1 000 000 cP and high solid content the UPD technology can be used for depositing conductive microdots below 10 µm in diameter and a very high aspect ratio for flip-chip application (for example micro-LED assembly).
UPD technology can also be used for the deposition of color-conversion layers based on quantum dots. We demonstrated technology that allows direct deposition of Quantum Dots material, simplifying the whole process and reducing the overall manufacturing cost. Moreover, it increases resolution: microdots currently obtained on the market usually have about 50 μm, the minimum is 20 μm – while we demonstrated with UPD technology dots with a diameter of even less than 5 μm. Compared to other digital additive manufacturing techniques like inkjet and EHD, UPD technology allows the deposit of high uniformity and repeatability structures with the use of inks with a higher concentration of QDs. This, according to Beer’s law, directly affects light absorption by the QDs. The combination of unique capabilities of the UPD printing method provides the solution for efficient fabrication of QD color conversion for next-generation Micro-LED displays.

Sub-micron digital printing for microLED microbumps and QD Color Conversion

5.25PM

Ultra-Precise Deposition (UPD) is an additive manufacturing technique for fabricating conductive and non-conductive features at a micrometer scale. The process does not require an electric field, the deposition can be made on any substrate (conductive and non-conductive, planar and 3D) and materials with viscosities up to 1 000 00 cP can be printed in full resolution range. The combination of unique features can be used for fabricating next-generation OLED, MicroLED, and QD-LED displays.
Due to precise pressure control and the system's design, UPD allows depositing material with femtoliter precision. Together with the possibility to deposit materials with viscosities up to 1 000 000 cP and high solid content the UPD technology can be used for depositing conductive microdots below 10 µm in diameter and a very high aspect ratio for flip-chip application (for example micro-LED assembly).
UPD technology can also be used for the deposition of color-conversion layers based on quantum dots. We demonstrated technology that allows direct deposition of Quantum Dots material, simplifying the whole process and reducing the overall manufacturing cost. Moreover, it increases resolution: microdots currently obtained on the market usually have about 50 μm, the minimum is 20 μm – while we demonstrated with UPD technology dots with a diameter of even less than 5 μm. Compared to other digital additive manufacturing techniques like inkjet and EHD, UPD technology allows the deposit of high uniformity and repeatability structures with the use of inks with a higher concentration of QDs. This, according to Beer’s law, directly affects light absorption by the QDs. The combination of unique capabilities of the UPD printing method provides the solution for efficient fabrication of QD color conversion for next-generation Micro-LED displays.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Morphotonics

Wednesday

Roll-to-Plate (R2P) Nanoimprinting for MicroLens Arrays on Mini-MicroLEDs

More Details

5.40PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Erhan Ercan

Head of Global Business Development

Morphotonics has set the standard in the replication of structures that range from 500 microns down to 50 nanometers on large areas of greater than 1-meter square. Our Roll-to-Plate (R2P) technology and
equipment not only enable manufacturing scalability (thus lowering unit costs) but also offer high replication fidelity down to picometer-scale. R2P technology is already being used to manufacture optical components inside commercial displays currently on the market. Additionally, R2P-based waveguide manufacturing is a strong candidate for addressing the high-volume manufacturing needs of emerging Augmented Reality (AR) glasses.
We have replicated many Micro Lens Array (MLA) optical structures for a variety of applications. Using aligned micro-optics, we can address the light collimation challenges that Mini- and MicroLEDs face to
achieve higher energy efficiency and lower power consumption. We are currently developing equipment that will significantly improve the overlay accuracy down to ±5 microns, allowing us to address the optical collimation needs of MicroLED displays.
Consequently, we are exploring several ways to address this emerging segment of the display market inthe near future.

Roll-to-Plate (R2P) Nanoimprinting for MicroLens Arrays on Mini-MicroLEDs

5.40PM

Morphotonics has set the standard in the replication of structures that range from 500 microns down to 50 nanometers on large areas of greater than 1-meter square. Our Roll-to-Plate (R2P) technology and
equipment not only enable manufacturing scalability (thus lowering unit costs) but also offer high replication fidelity down to picometer-scale. R2P technology is already being used to manufacture optical components inside commercial displays currently on the market. Additionally, R2P-based waveguide manufacturing is a strong candidate for addressing the high-volume manufacturing needs of emerging Augmented Reality (AR) glasses.
We have replicated many Micro Lens Array (MLA) optical structures for a variety of applications. Using aligned micro-optics, we can address the light collimation challenges that Mini- and MicroLEDs face to
achieve higher energy efficiency and lower power consumption. We are currently developing equipment that will significantly improve the overlay accuracy down to ±5 microns, allowing us to address the optical collimation needs of MicroLED displays.
Consequently, we are exploring several ways to address this emerging segment of the display market inthe near future.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Networking Break

Wednesday

Meet The Speakers/Networking

More Details

5.55PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png
Talk Demo

Meet The Speakers/Networking

5.55PM

Watch Demo Video
TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

Yole Intelligence

Wednesday

Trends in miniLED technologies, market and supply chain.

More Details

6.20PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Eric Virey

Senior Market and Technology Analyst - Displays

MicroLED is still mostly in the process of transitioning from the lab to high-volume manufacturing. MiniLEDs, on the other hand, have already attracted more than $15 billion of investment for manufacturing infrastructure and are commonly used in high volume consumer products as well as in B2B, direct view LED displays.
MiniLEDs backlights can supercharge LCD panels, allowing them to compete against OLEDs in high-end, high-added value consumer markets. In industrial markets, narrow pixel pitch miniLED displays are growing at a 24% CAGR.
With OLED continuously improving, is the window of opportunity already closing for miniLED backlights? Will miniLED dominate in direct view LED displays and converge with microLEDs to break into the consumer market?
This presentation will discuss miniLED markets, applications, supply chain as well as technology trends based on device teardowns and performance measurements conducted by Yole Group.

Trends in miniLED technologies, market and supply chain.

6.20PM

MicroLED is still mostly in the process of transitioning from the lab to high-volume manufacturing. MiniLEDs, on the other hand, have already attracted more than $15 billion of investment for manufacturing infrastructure and are commonly used in high volume consumer products as well as in B2B, direct view LED displays.
MiniLEDs backlights can supercharge LCD panels, allowing them to compete against OLEDs in high-end, high-added value consumer markets. In industrial markets, narrow pixel pitch miniLED displays are growing at a 24% CAGR.
With OLED continuously improving, is the window of opportunity already closing for miniLED backlights? Will miniLED dominate in direct view LED displays and converge with microLEDs to break into the consumer market?
This presentation will discuss miniLED markets, applications, supply chain as well as technology trends based on device teardowns and performance measurements conducted by Yole Group.

TechBlick-favicon.png
30 November 2022

SmartKem

Wednesday

Monolithic MicroLED Arrays Using Organic Thin-Film Transistors

More Details

6.35PM

joint-presentations.png
TechBlick-favicon_edited.png

Ian Jenks

CEO